Tag Archives: dogs

The Sad Story of Laika, the First Dog Launched Into Orbit

It was a Space Race victory that would have broken Sarah McLachlan’s heart. On this day, Nov. 3, in 1957, the Soviet Union launched the first-ever living animal into orbit: a dog named Laika. The flight was meant to test the safety of space travel for humans, but it was a guaranteed suicide mission for the dog, since technology hadn’t advanced as far as the return trip.

Laika was a stray, picked up from the Moscow streets just over a week before the rocket was set to launch. She was promoted to cosmonaut based partly on her size (small) and demeanor (calm), according to the Associated Press. All of the 36 dogs the Soviets sent into space — before Yuri Gagarin became the first human to orbit Earth — were strays, chosen for their scrappiness. (Other dogs had gone into space before Laika, but only for sub-orbital launches.) The mission was another in a series of coups for the Soviet Union, which was then leading the way in space exploration while the United States lagged. Just a month earlier, they had launched Sputnik, the world’s first satellite. When Laika’s vessel, Sputnik 2, shot into orbit, the U.S. fell even further behind.

News media alternated between mockery and pity for the dog sent into space. According to a 1957 TIME report on how the press was covering the event, “headlines yelped such barbaric new words as pupnik and pooch-nik, sputpup and woofnik,” before ultimately settling on “Muttnik.”

“The Chicago American noted: ‘The Russian sputpup isn’t the first dog in the sky. That honor belongs to the dog star. But we’re getting too Sirius,’” the piece adds.

Other headline-writers treated Laika with more compassion. According to another story in the same issue, the Brits were especially full of feeling for the dog — and outrage toward the Russians. “THE DOG WILL DIE, WE CAN’T SAVE IT, wailed London’s mass-minded Daily Mirror,” the story declares. The Soviet embassy in London was forced to switch from celebration mode to damage control.

“The Russians love dogs,” a Soviet official protested, per TIME. “This has been done not for the sake of cruelty but for the benefit of humanity.”

Nearly a half-century later, Russian officials found themselves handling PR fallout once again after it was revealed that reports of Laika’s humane death were greatly exaggerated.

Although they had long insisted that Laika expired painlessly after about a week in orbit, an official with Moscow’s Institute for Biological Problems leaked the true story in 2002: She died within hours of takeoff from panic and overheating, according to the BBC. Sputnik 2 continued to orbit the Earth for five months, then burned up when it reentered the atmosphere in April 1958.

One of Laika’s human counterparts in the Soviet space program recalled her as a good dog. He even brought her home to play with his children before she began her space odyssey.

“Laika was quiet and charming,” Dr. Vladimir Yazdovsky wrote in a book about Soviet space medicine, as quoted by the AP. “I wanted to do something nice for her: She had so little time left to live.”

Source: www.time.com

 

Everything You Need To Know About Alaskan Malamute

Alaskan malamute dogs should be one of the largest anywhere in the world. This tough breed is perfect for use as working dogs, particularly in colder atmospheres. Before embracing or getting one, discover all the more fascinating certainties about this great pooch breed. The unforgiving Arctic scene was its unique environment. Early Arctic adventurers rushed to utilize this current canine’s radiant quality in their campaigns. They were initially used to draw sleds conveying imperative supplies. Its thick coat makes short work of even the hardest frigid climate. In later years, they were utilized for search and safeguard missions. These dogs were additionally utilized for pulling sleds for competitions and racing. Alaskan Malamute training won’t be an issue if you have full insight. This is quite recently consummate since it additionally has the stamina to continue going more distant than other breeds. Keeping this dog breed dynamic surely has its prizes.

These enormous wolf-like pets are a portion of the friendliest pets you could own. There are a couple of Malamutes (Mals) that pull individuals, cargo or substantial items, albeit most malamute breeds are utilized for show or as pets. While this breed can pull weighty stuff, they are for the most part not appropriate for far destination races, in which case, the Siberian Husky, Alaskan Husky or Eskimo Dog would be a better choice, since they are a breed know for their agility.

Alaskan Malamutes are an exceptionally friendly breed that flourishes with human camaraderie. In a perfect world, your pet will have the capacity to parade about as it sees fit through any doggie-entryway, having the flexibility to relax outside in the shade or be spending time with humans and enjoying affection or being ordered around. Talking about “orders,” Mals can be headstrong dogs on the off chance that you don’t set aside the opportunity to prepare them when they’re young.

Try not to stress: they are savvy and brisk learners if you utilize positive prizes. Make sure to tell them who’s the “Alpha Dog” in your home at an opportune time! This breed gets exhausted effortlessly and needs a considerable measure of activity. Your Malamute might be a digger, so it’s best to set up a shaded range where your puppy can delve his paws into the cool earth if need be. In case you’re searching for a watch guard dog, then you are on the wrong path; this breed appreciates people to an extreme degree excessively!

Over feeding will bring about most Alaskan Malamutes to weigh 900 lbs. They love to eat and will eat until there is no nourishment left.  Expect starving frantic looks regardless of the possibility that they have just been fed. They are NOT starving; however, they will endeavor to persuade you they are. You should be intense. When you give a treat, give a TINY piece, not an entire roll. You do your dog no favors getting him fat. Inquisitively, it appears the fatter they get, the more they act like they are hungry.

12 Ways Adopting a Rescue Pet Will Improve Your Life

So, you’ve been thinking about inviting a new furry family member into the home. The options of where to find a new pet usually come down to: a breeder, a rescue organization or shelter, or waiting around until someone you know finds themselves with an unexpected litter at home.

While breeders allow for a custom-tailored choice, that is about their only upside. They can vary from more-upstanding-than-most to downright abusive, but all breeders have one thing in common: for every breeder pet you buy, one rescue pet is denied the opportunity to live in a wonderful home.

Not only does rescuing an animal improve their lives—drastically!—but, it can also improve yours. Here are some reasons to consider bringing home a rescue fur baby that will make both you and your new addition live happily ever after.

1. You will be the first and only home your pet will ever know. So many pets come from sad and abusive situations—you will be her reminder there is good in the world!

2. Snuggles feel better when you know you are giving love to someone who was otherwise forgotten.

3. If you bring home a pup, you will be saving one of the 1.2 million shelter dogs euthanized every year.

4. Knowing you are giving your little guy or girl a warm spot to rest, eat and play will make your heart soar.

5. Seeing a rescue pet figure out how to play or that he is allowed to cuddle up on a blanket, instead of the hard floor, is indescribable.

6. You will get to see why purebred does not mean superior. Mutts are awesome! And healthier as well.

7. You can breathe a sigh of relief knowing your money did not go toward an establishment with terrible and horrific living conditions for pets.

8. Taking home a sweetheart from a shelter frees up a spot for another pet who is otherwise completely homeless.

9. Seeing the signs that your new fur baby trusts you will make you feel like a superhero.

10. If you adopted from a rescue shelter, you can rest easy knowing your money went to an organization that truly cares about animals.

11. Sometimes rescue pets need more TLC than others. This isn’t a reason not to adopt—it’s a reason to get excited about bonding with your pet on an even deeper level. The fact that you stick around during the hard times will mean the world to your little fluffball.

12. No matter what, your pet will love you—but there seems to be a special twinkle in a rescue pet’s eye that seems to say “Thank you.”

Source: Care2